Tag: digital

OMD FWD w/c 3rd September

Hello and welcome to your weekly FWD.

The rise of influencer marketing is causing waves as more and more fantasy-like posts surface which have generated comments calling Instagram ‘a ridiculous lie factory made to make us all feel inadequate’. The public are becoming attuned to paid posts, unrealistic images and the ‘highlight reel’ that is often the only visible representation of one’s life. In line with this, UK broadcasters are urging the government to create a social media watchdog to strengthen oversight of social media companies. The response? Yes, we know.

In the tech space, excitement is building over Apple’s impending product announcement on the 12th of September in Cupertino. The rumour mill is churning out speculation on whether the home button is being superseded with OLED screens, and if the iWatch will at last, be round.

HEADLINES

INSIGHTS

COOL

DEEP READS

Please feel free to pass OMD FWD onto your colleagues, clients and friends – they can subscribe here at any time and watch Wednesday’s get better! #OMDFWD


My Four Observations from The IAB Europe AdEx Benchmark report

The IAB Europe AdEx Benchmark report is always a great opportunity to halt the permanent hyperloop we all work in and take stock of exactly what our industry has gone through.We can see that growth has stayed at a consistent level of around 12% year-on-year over the past 5 years as online media matures, accounting for €42bn of all media. However, the following are four areas from this year’s report that I feel have driven real change within the market:

  1. Polarisation within Europe: The larger markets have matured as the tech landscape has settled and programmatic is now a cemented part of online activity within the largest markets.  This compares to the emerging markets, who are seeing rapid growth as the tech giants transfer the learnings from the mature markets’ earlier development and infrastructure. This has meant exponential growth for the likes of Romania and Slovenia, as the initial entrants into areas such as programmatic have been received positively, driving further confidence.
  2. The Organisation of Data: The accountability of online media has always been positive, but equally it has led to further complexity in the market.  Not only has measurement begun to see some degree of standardisation, helping brands understand true effectiveness over time, but it has also allowed for more dynamic, real time decisions to become a standard practice. However, this organisation of data has not just allowed for clearer measurement. Publishers and platforms have segmented their audiences with more effect – the understanding of observed behavioural insights, as well as development of robust custom audiences has meant that targeting is paying back a stronger ROI and, as a result, increasing investment.
  3. The Integration of Media and Content:  Building on the last point, and due to the complexity of formats that online media comes with, content is playing a tighter role within all media decisions.  The term “mobile first” is overused in our industry and not because people don’t appreciate the importance that the device plays in people’s lives, but because brands would all too often put their TV ad straight onto a mobile placement.  The insights we are getting from our ability to analyse data more effectively has meant that the content creation and production process is now more dynamic and increasingly relevant to the device, context and environment when served.
  4. The Growth of e-Commerce: The advancements of e-commerce from a platform experience (as well as improvements in distribution) have meant the consumer has more and more confidence in adopting this method of shopping.  This has naturally has led to a rise in more direct performance media such as search. As content experience improves and the fact that the point of desire and traction can now happen in a matter of seconds, more immersive forms of online content has begun to prove direct attribution to sales.

There are still many opportunities across the industry to improve the experience that brands provide within online media, as well as simplifying the technical infrastructure that they operate in.  However, there is a lot to be positive about as we enter the 3rd wave of disruption and the mass adoption of areas such as Artificial Intelligence and the internet of things.


My Four Observations from The IAB Europe AdEx Benchmark report

The IAB Europe AdEx Benchmark report is always a great opportunity to halt the permanent hyperloop we all work in and take stock of exactly what our industry has gone through.We can see that growth has stayed at a consistent level of around 12% year-on-year over the past 5 years as online media matures, accounting for €42bn of all media. However, the following are four areas from this year’s report that I feel have driven real change within the market:

  1. Polarisation within Europe: The larger markets have matured as the tech landscape has settled and programmatic is now a cemented part of online activity within the largest markets.  This compares to the emerging markets, who are seeing rapid growth as the tech giants transfer the learnings from the mature markets’ earlier development and infrastructure. This has meant exponential growth for the likes of Romania and Slovenia, as the initial entrants into areas such as programmatic have been received positively, driving further confidence.
  2. The Organisation of Data: The accountability of online media has always been positive, but equally it has led to further complexity in the market.  Not only has measurement begun to see some degree of standardisation, helping brands understand true effectiveness over time, but it has also allowed for more dynamic, real time decisions to become a standard practice. However, this organisation of data has not just allowed for clearer measurement. Publishers and platforms have segmented their audiences with more effect – the understanding of observed behavioural insights, as well as development of robust custom audiences has meant that targeting is paying back a stronger ROI and, as a result, increasing investment.
  3. The Integration of Media and Content:  Building on the last point, and due to the complexity of formats that online media comes with, content is playing a tighter role within all media decisions.  The term “mobile first” is overused in our industry and not because people don’t appreciate the importance that the device plays in people’s lives, but because brands would all too often put their TV ad straight onto a mobile placement.  The insights we are getting from our ability to analyse data more effectively has meant that the content creation and production process is now more dynamic and increasingly relevant to the device, context and environment when served.
  4. The Growth of e-Commerce: The advancements of e-commerce from a platform experience (as well as improvements in distribution) have meant the consumer has more and more confidence in adopting this method of shopping.  This has naturally has led to a rise in more direct performance media such as search. As content experience improves and the fact that the point of desire and traction can now happen in a matter of seconds, more immersive forms of online content has begun to prove direct attribution to sales.

There are still many opportunities across the industry to improve the experience that brands provide within online media, as well as simplifying the technical infrastructure that they operate in.  However, there is a lot to be positive about as we enter the 3rd wave of disruption and the mass adoption of areas such as Artificial Intelligence and the internet of things.


OMD FWD w/c May 2nd

Hello and welcome to the latest edition of OMD FWD. As Twitter numbers soar, Google spares your blushes by helping you find your parked car, whilst Amazon Echo tells you what it really thinks of your outfit. You can even chew the fat with Albert Einstein on Messenger and once you’re done, learn how to give your brain a much-needed digital detox.

HEADLINES

 INSIGHTS

COOL

DEEP READS

If anything piques your interest, please share at #OMDFWD.


OMD FWD w/c May 2nd

Hello and welcome to the latest edition of OMD FWD. As Twitter numbers soar, Google spares your blushes by helping you find your parked car, whilst Amazon Echo tells you what it really thinks of your outfit. You can even chew the fat with Albert Einstein on Messenger and once you’re done, learn how to give your brain a much-needed digital detox.

HEADLINES

 INSIGHTS

COOL

DEEP READS

If anything piques your interest, please share at #OMDFWD.


Introducing a new video code of conduct for luxury marketing

The luxury industry has started carving its own space in the social sphere, setting its own behaviour, managing consumer expectations and showcasing its personality. It is by understanding the data behind this landscape, and through partnerships like Tubular Labs, that we are unlocking preferences and uncovering emerging behaviours.

GENUINE AND RELEVANT

Adverts and premium content currently deliver the lowest return in engagement compared to the volume uploaded. Mystery is no longer enough, consumers are craving more entry into the exclusive world of luxury to observe the beauty, craft and story of every angle of luxury brands. It is this genuine content – fashion shows, montages and behind the brand access – that is driving 74% of all luxury video engagements.

However, brands also need to harness the power of digital content. There is an opportunity for luxury brands to deliver content solutions dynamically, serving more relevant videos based on data such as age, interest and behaviour.

Looking specifically at the luxury watch category, as expected, 73% of YouTube engagement is driven by those under the age of 34, who are mainly luxury owners in waiting. Perhaps surprising, luxury watch videos are also generating 18% of their engagements from those over 55 years old, which is 14 times the YouTube average.

Nevertheless, how these audiences engage with luxury watch video content is different. Those under 35 years focus on beauty and entertainment influencers, concentrating on how luxury brands make them look. Older audiences, meanwhile, engage with influencers who concentrate on craftsmanship and in-depth luxury product reviews.

Tailor cutting fabric for bespoke suit

AUTHENTICITY AND ORIGINALITY

The new influencer authority is authenticity and originality. As tempting as it is to seed products for visibility, luxury brands need to be selective. The rapid adoption of influencer strategies for categories from FMCG to luxury automobiles has also left consumers more sceptical of the true relationship between brands and influencers. As a result, only 16 luxury lifestyle influencers made The Sermo Digital Influencer Index cut.

Choosing the right influencers is absolutely critical, involving in-depth research identifying a profile of their background, beliefs and audience to ascertain if they truly fit the brand’s vision. For luxury brands it is not about volume, it is about the right contextual fit, originality and innovation which an influencer partnership can generate.

For example, as the official watch partner of FC Barcelona football club, Maurice Lacroix’s ‘Unique Fans Watch’ campaign invited the team’s players to design their own Maurice Lacroix Pontos S Extreme watches. The partnership has resulted in 20 videos, generating more than 9.8 million views and over 404,000 unique engagements or interactions. Additionally, the campaign generated 41% more visits to the partnership site and increased Maurice Lacroix social media fan base by over 11,000 fans.

“Luxury brands are always leading and setting the standard, that’s why people are eager to see what’s next”

Despite the niche nature of luxury, brands still need to produce content for the masses. By utilising popular themes, events and culture, brands can create a universal understanding to build brand desire and convert demand. The balance brands need to strike is between humanising their influencers and still driving views and engagement with topical content, such as unboxing which accounted for 72% of the luxury watch topics viewed in 2017.

Luxury brands are always leading and setting the standard, that’s why people are eager to see what’s next. Just like film studios, luxury brands have anticipated releases and consumer expectations to meet. Whether it’s their collections or showcases the bar for luxury has always been set high and that’s no different for their social channels.

The most successful luxury brands have embraced the opportunity of social video to truly immerse people in their unique stories, building authenticity and equity in this redefined category.

To access a summary of the study, click here (PDF).

Originally posted at M&M Global


Luxury in a Digital Age: New Video Code of Conduct in Luxury Marketing

In recent years, big luxury brands have been shifting their ad spend to digital channels and we are now seeing print trends like the ‘September Issue’ emerge across social video. The insights were revealed today in the joint study, New Video Code of Conduct in Luxury Marketing, between OMD EMEA and Tubular Labs, uncovering social video insights across select sectors of the luxury industry.

“The exclusive and crafted nature of luxury brands meeting the open accessibility of online video was always going to be a challenge,” said Blake Cuthbert, Chief Digital Officer, OMD EMEA. “The most successful luxury brands have embraced the opportunity by allowing their followers to be truly immersed in their unique stories, building authenticity and equity in this redefined category.”

GETTING THE BACKSTAGE PASS – UNEDITED & UNFILTERED

Adverts and premium content currently deliver the lowest return in engagement compared to the volume uploaded. Mystery is no longer enough, consumers are craving more access into the world of luxury. It is the ‘real’ content – fashion shows, montages and behind the brand access – that is driving 74 per cent of all luxury video engagements. In response creative directors are taking the lead, opening up their world and sharing what’s happening behind the scenes in real-time.

THE NEW INFLUENCER AUTHORITY – AUTHENTICITY & ORIGINALITY

The rapid adoption of influencer strategies for categories from FMCG to luxury automobiles has also left consumers more sceptical of the true relationship between brands and influencers. As a result, only 16 luxury lifestyle influencers made The Sermo Digital Influencer Index cut. The balance brands need to strike is between humanising their influencers and still driving views and engagement with topical content, such as unboxing which accounted for 72 per cent of the luxury watch topics viewed in 2017.

PASSION HAS NO AGE – JUST COMMON GROUND

Nevertheless, how different audiences engage with luxury video content is unique. Looking specifically at the luxury watch category, as expected 73 per cent of YouTube engagement is driven by those under the age of 34. Perhaps surprising, luxury watch videos are also generating 18 per cent of their engagements from those over 55 years old, which is 14 times the YouTube average over the last 365 days.

THE COUTURE CONTENT SOLUTION – DYNAMICALLY SERVED BY AGE, INTEREST & BEHAVIOUR

Those under 35 years old focus on beauty and entertainment influencers, concentrating on how luxury brands make them look. While the older audience engages with influencers who concentrate on craftsmanship and in-depth luxury product reviews. There is an opportunity for luxury brands to deliver content solutions dynamically, serving more relevant videos based on data such as age, interest and behaviour.

“With the growth of online video, brands are increasingly leveraging video to create and distribute content online,” said Denis Crushell, VP of EMEA, Tubular Labs. “Results of the luxury industry and social video study confirm this with luxury brands accumulating over 500 million cross-platform views in Q4 2016 alone. It’s commendable when leading organisations like OMD recognise the importance of this transformation and take action to provide their clients with powerful actionable insights.”

Want to know more, contact us at [email protected]


Luxury in a Digital Age: New Video Code of Conduct in Luxury Marketing

In recent years, big luxury brands have been shifting their ad spend to digital channels and we are now seeing print trends like the ‘September Issue’ emerge across social video. The insights were revealed today in the joint study, New Video Code of Conduct in Luxury Marketing, between OMD EMEA and Tubular Labs, uncovering social video insights across select sectors of the luxury industry.

“The exclusive and crafted nature of luxury brands meeting the open accessibility of online video was always going to be a challenge,” said Blake Cuthbert, Chief Digital Officer, OMD EMEA. “The most successful luxury brands have embraced the opportunity by allowing their followers to be truly immersed in their unique stories, building authenticity and equity in this redefined category.”

GETTING THE BACKSTAGE PASS – UNEDITED & UNFILTERED

Adverts and premium content currently deliver the lowest return in engagement compared to the volume uploaded. Mystery is no longer enough, consumers are craving more access into the world of luxury. It is the ‘real’ content – fashion shows, montages and behind the brand access – that is driving 74 per cent of all luxury video engagements. In response creative directors are taking the lead, opening up their world and sharing what’s happening behind the scenes in real-time.

THE NEW INFLUENCER AUTHORITY – AUTHENTICITY & ORIGINALITY

The rapid adoption of influencer strategies for categories from FMCG to luxury automobiles has also left consumers more sceptical of the true relationship between brands and influencers. As a result, only 16 luxury lifestyle influencers made The Sermo Digital Influencer Index cut. The balance brands need to strike is between humanising their influencers and still driving views and engagement with topical content, such as unboxing which accounted for 72 per cent of the luxury watch topics viewed in 2017.

PASSION HAS NO AGE – JUST COMMON GROUND

Nevertheless, how different audiences engage with luxury video content is unique. Looking specifically at the luxury watch category, as expected 73 per cent of YouTube engagement is driven by those under the age of 34. Perhaps surprising, luxury watch videos are also generating 18 per cent of their engagements from those over 55 years old, which is 14 times the YouTube average over the last 365 days.

THE COUTURE CONTENT SOLUTION – DYNAMICALLY SERVED BY AGE, INTEREST & BEHAVIOUR

Those under 35 years old focus on beauty and entertainment influencers, concentrating on how luxury brands make them look. While the older audience engages with influencers who concentrate on craftsmanship and in-depth luxury product reviews. There is an opportunity for luxury brands to deliver content solutions dynamically, serving more relevant videos based on data such as age, interest and behaviour.

“With the growth of online video, brands are increasingly leveraging video to create and distribute content online,” said Denis Crushell, VP of EMEA, Tubular Labs. “Results of the luxury industry and social video study confirm this with luxury brands accumulating over 500 million cross-platform views in Q4 2016 alone. It’s commendable when leading organisations like OMD recognise the importance of this transformation and take action to provide their clients with powerful actionable insights.”

Want to know more, contact us at [email protected]


OMD FWD w/c Nov 7th

Traditional e-commerce websites may be good for shopping when you know what you’re looking for. But for those times when you don’t, Instagram has introduced new features. These new features will help users identify products in Instagram photos from brands. Vishal Shah, Instagram’s Head of Product Management for Monetization, mentions that even though we have seen progress in mobile purchasing “these two things — discovery and the actual purchase — are just not well-connected like in physical stores”. The feature will enable retailers to price label their products on the platform and then direct customers to their mobile website – still not enabling users to purchase through the app. However, Shah does mention that commerce will evolve into big business in the future – either through ads or a cut in sales.

HEADLINES

  • Facebook is a hive of activity, reporting very strong Q3 fiscal results, testing instant games it now wants to start selling TV spots on TVs through Apple TV and Roku
  • In a move that will please e-commerce teams, Instagram is set to add some shoppable features
  • WhatsApp tests Status, a new feature that’s like Snapchat stories as the platform continues to evolve

 INSIGHTS

COOL

DEEP READS

Share anything you see through the week with the hashtag #OMDFWD


Meet Tia-Nicole Knight, OMD Intern from the FastForward Programme

Tia-Nicole Knight took part in the FastForward programme last year and is now an intern at OMD. One of her highlights was finding out about cookies and how they support websites. Before she started the course she had only heard of the cookies you eat. We sat down with Tina-Nicole to find out more about her FastForward experience.

How did you get involved in the FastForward programme and why did it appeal to you?

Last year, OMD and Citizens UK came to present at my college. At first, the programme didn’t appeal to me as I was studying creative media rather than digital. I thought it might be too technical for my skillset, but I soon realised it was a great opportunity. After completing my application form and successfully passing a group interview, I was invited to JP Morgan’s offices. This is where we were told what we would be covering over the next six months and nine sessions.

Did you find it challenging with your existing studies?

During the 6 months, I managed to keep up with all my studies, except for one session. Fortunately, the other students shared notes, so I was able to catch up quickly.

Which part of the course did you like most?

My favourite session was on ‘Data Handling’ where I learnt how to target audiences using a tool called TGI. I really enjoyed this as we had to create a story around the data.  My group came up with an INSANE idea with widows, betrayal, death, murder, partying, laughter, sadness and cleaning products! Everyone laughed when we presented, but we still managed to show that we understood the concept.

From the sessions, what did you learn that surprised you?

When I first heard about coding, I started thinking ‘woah this must be like, what hackers do’. I thought there was going to be an overload of knowledge throughout the session. However, it was explained so clearly that in the end I had a semi-clear idea of what it was. I still struggle to understand it fully, but it’s really complex!

What advice would you give to others thinking of participating in the FastForward programme?

Be yourself! Anyone can get experience, be punctual and show up for sessions. But, it’s your personality and unique qualities that are hard to find. Show that you stand out from the crowd with your creativity and other skills!

Interested in knowing more? Explore recent FastForward updates here. You can also find out more about life at OMD with #OMDLife


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